Brits, Stop Gambling With Your Health!

Hope abroad for those seeking IVF and optical surgeries

A failing system

When did healthcare become a trip to the casino? A game of Roulette after a few watered down vodka drinks. Put all your money on red, cross your fingers and hope that the odds are in your favour. However, even the most experienced gambler knows, once the chips leave your hand, all bets are off, and the dealer is always counting his money. This analogy, although a stretch, is probably closer to the truth than we’re willing to admit. Currently the UK is providing free healthcare to nearly 64.6 million people; 54.3 million in England alone. As of 2016, this means nearly 1 million patients every 36 hours.

According to the King’s Fund review, the NHS is at its most critical crossroad in decades. Growing deficits, burnt-out underpaid staff, and ever-increasingly long wait times for A&E, cancer care and even routine operations have left the once globally renowned healthcare system in a crippling state. The popular think tank said drops in performance are at the lowest they have seen since the early 1990’s, and the UK’s gaping wound is only getting larger.

“The next government will inherit a health service that has run out of money and is operating at the very edge of its limit,” commented public health policy expert, and professor, John Appleby. There is now a real risk that patient care will deteriorate as service and financial pressures become overwhelming.”

Roll of the dice

Of all the challenges facing universal healthcare, the most troubling for citizens may be the constant gamble as to whether a treatment will be approved or not. While the NHS covers everything from routine screenings, to treatment for long-term conditions and end-of-life care, the stakes become increasingly high in regards to prescription costs, optical and dental services, and fertility treatments such as IVF. Read more