What Men Really Think About A Mommy Makeover

In a recent poll, men were asked how they felt about their wife getting a ‘Mommy Makeover’ after having children. Out of nearly 300 men, about 52% agreed that if it was something she needed to feel confident in her body again- then yes, go for it! It may also be the reason behind how so many Hollywood starlets seem to snap right back to their pre-baby bodies. 

kim-kardashian

Kim Kardashian 2016 post-baby body is nearly unrecognizable compared to 2015 when she was pregnant with her second child. Many speculate that she had a Mommy Makeover to help her transformation.

What exactly does a Mommy Makeover entail?

A little bit of everything. A Mommy Makeover is not cosmetic surgery procedures in and of itself. On the contrary, it consists of a series of smaller procedures which the surgeon performs at the same time. Case in point, meet Angelia.

Angelia (Liverpool, UK) is a mother of 3 young boys, and at the age of 38 decided that she was not happy with her body.

“Motherhood is the most beautiful, and most challenging thing I’ve ever done in my life. I’m proud of what my body has endured over the past 7 years but, I’m still human. I still have insecurities. When my girlfriends, who are also mums, and I get together for a chat, we always talk about how fantastic our bodies were before children. Things sag and giggle now were they didn’t use to, and even with diet and exercise, non of us have completely fit back into or skinny jeans. It’s totally normal, but I don’t want to spend the next 15 years raising my boys and worrying about my muffin top. That’s why next month I will be having a ‘mummy makeover’. It will include a breast lift, tummy tuck and liposuction of my buttocks and thighs.”


“Motherhood is the most beautiful, and most challenging thing I’ve ever done in my life. I’m proud of what my body has endured over the past 7 years but, I’m still human. I still have insecurities.”


After speaking we Angelia we asked her husband, Paul, 42, what how he felt about his wife’s decision to have cosmetic surgery.

mommy-makeover

“It’s her body, and her decision. Of course I told her what all good husbands do, ‘hun you’re perfect the way you are’. And I mean that. But I could tell she was insecure about her body after having the boys. She started opting for clothing that’s sole purpose was to cover her up. That’s not the confident, bold, sexy Angelia I met 10 years ago. So if this makes her feel sexy, and beautiful again in her own skin, then I support her.”

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Paul is not alone. In fact, another 12% of men polled actually said they would encourage their wives to have a few tips and tucks after pregnancy. Andy (Tampa, Florida), 36, even surprised his wife with a Mommy Makeover for their 5th wedding anniversary.

“[My wife] Kate complained for years after our daughter was born that she hated her breasts. I hardly noticed a difference, but after breast feeding and losing the baby weight, she said her breasts had actually shrunk. Like I said, from looking at Kate it was hardly noticeable, but what mattered was that she noticed. It bothered her to the point that she stopped wearing bikini tops, or changing in front of me. So as a gift for our 5th wedding anniversary I got her breast augmentation. I actually offered it, and she was over the moon about, thinking we couldn’t afford it. Kate is now a full C, slightly larger than her pre-pregnancy breasts, and she loves them. I do too.”

Which Procedures Should I Have Done? 

mommy makeover, tummy-tuck

Mommy Makeover tummy tuck, before and after.

A standard Mommy Makeover targets the following 3 areas: 

  1. Breasts According to the American Society of Plastic Surgery, one of the most common issues after childbirth is a change in the size or shape of breasts. To treat this issue, woman can choose from several different types of procedures. While breast implants are the most well-known, many mommy’s opt for a breast lift or breast augmentation instead. This helps change or enhance the shape of the breast after childbirth. 
  2. Tummy- After 9 months of pregnancy, a the shape of a woman’s stomach may change a lot. Although natural weight loss can occur with diet and exercise, many women have problems with sagging, excess skin left over. In this case, a tummy tuck is often suggested, rather than liposuction, restoring a more natural, thinner appearance.
  3. Lower BodySimilar to excess skin, women are often left with stubborn fat deposits after childbirth. Even intense diet and exercise may not always solve these changes. For these patients, Liposuction is one way to target and remove unwanted fat from the stomach, thighs or buttocks. Other women may choose to have a lower body lift, which tightens sagging skin around the thighs, hips or buttocks.

I’m Worried I’ll Have Trouble Getting Pregnant, But I’ve Never Tried Before

What If I Can’t Get Pregnant?

Have you ever asked yourself this question before? Many women have, but don’t like to talk about it. In our baby-bump obsessed culture, conceiving seems as about as easy as binge-watching your favorite Netflix series. We obsess over the pregnant celebrities, ohhh and aahh over gifts at our friends baby-showers. Push presents are even a thing now. Rarely do we talk about the fears and anxieties surrounding conception. And while we’re aware that infertility exists, many women worry silently if they will become another statistic.

blake-lively

So why are women, specifically young women, worrying that they’ll have trouble getting pregnant?

Well, as it turns out, women are only born with a finite amount of eggs- one to two million to be exact. Naturally, as women age, eggs are released, and over time, the numbers begin to drop. After age 30, the chances of having a baby begin to decrease by 3-5% each year. After 40, fertility reduces by an even greater extent.

Over the past 25 years, many women are steadily starting families later in life. In the United States, the average age of first time mothers is at an all-time high of 26 years. In the UK, it is even higher, at 28.5 years. As a result, women are more open about infertility and IVF treatments. It’s a major step forward in its own rights, but is also perpetuating some unnecessary fear in young women who have not even tried getting pregnant yet.

Is There Anything To Worry About? 

Yes and No. In an interview with Bustle.com, Julianne Zweifel, a clinical psychologist and Obstetrics and Gynecology professor said, “‘[If you’re young], the odds [of getting pregnant] are still dramatically in your favor…But if you’re the person on the negative end of that percentage, it’s bad. When you are 30 years old and you have fertility problems, you are even angrier than when you’re 36.”

She adds, “You have a backdrop in society of women having kids later and later…You think, ‘Maybe this is more possible’ and you’re lulled into a false sense of security. [But] we weren’t just created in 2014 with bodies that were created in 2014. It really might work out, but the older you get, the less likely that is.”

While this may ease the minds of some young women, for others the fear of infertility is very real.

Emily, a 27 year old, Australian school teacher had this to say,couple

“I just got married this summer. Since then, my husband and I can’t talk about anything else besides babies. It’s our dream to start a family, but privately I worry, ‘what if I can’t get pregnant?’. At the moment we are not trying, and I have never tried before, but I always have this reoccurring feeling that for whatever reasons, my body just won’t be able to conceive.”

Fortunately, Emily is not alone. In a recent survey of 50 hopeful, future-mothers (ages 21-30), 36 reported having similar fears, despite never having tried to conceive before.

“Of course I think about. I think most women do, but we don’t like to talk about it. Not even to or girlfriends. Instead of, ‘When I get pregnant…’, more and more young women are wondering, ‘If I can get pregnant…’. (Joanne, 24, Grad Student, U.K.)


Instead of, “When I get pregnant…”, more and more young women are wondering, “If I can get pregnant…”


“It’s so weird, and my husband and I never talk about it. When I was a teenager I know I had unsafe sex a lot, and nothing ever happened, so I just feel like their must be something biologically wrong with me. Like either I was very lucky, or I have to be infertile.” (Sara, 28, Realtor, U.S.) 

How Easy Is It To Get Pregnant, Really?

Well, statistics actually show that 85% of all couples trying to conceive will get pregnant within 12 months. Those numbers are pretty high. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 94% of American women are fertile and 89% will not have any trouble getting pregnant. Similarly in Great Britain, where according to the British Pregnancy Advisory Service, 90 percent of women age 19–39pregnant will conceive after two years of actively trying to have a baby.

According to recent statistics from Baby Centre UK, out of 100 couples trying to naturally conceive naturally:

  • 20 will conceive within one month
  • 70 will conceive within six months
  • 85 will conceive within one year
  • 90 will conceive within 18 months
  • 95 will conceive within two years

While taking up to two years to get pregnant is normal for some couples, it may feel like a long time. However, it doesn’t necessarily mean you have a fertility problem. If you are already trying, remember to keep trying. Half of the couples under 35 who don’t get pregnant within a year, will likely conceive the following year.

What Do New Mothers Fear Most About Their Post-Baby Body: ?

Post-Baby Body 

Conception is the miracle of life. For centuries, pregnant bodies have been marveled at, celebrated, and even worshipped. Nowadays, baby-bumps still never cease to amazes us. Just ask any expecting mother if they had a dollar for every person who asked to touch their bellies.

However, women today (especially young mothers) face more body and beauty standards than ever before. The constant pressure to have the “perfect body”, both pre- and post- pregnancy, is even enough for some women to forego pregnancy altogether.

In an interview with several soon-to-be mommies, we asked: what worries them most about their postpartum figures?

pregnant-2

The average woman gains approximately 12.5kg (27.6lb) during her pregnancy.

 New Mommy Worries

“I’m worried about stretch-marks. I appreciate all of the women who says, ‘stretch marks are battle wounds’. Confidence is important, but personally I don’t look forward to them.” (Michelle, 26, UK)

“Saggy boobs, for sure. I’ve always had large breasts, and since getting pregnant, they’ve gotten even bigger. At first I loved it-so did my husband-but now I just worry about the shape and size they’ll return to after the birth.” (Mary-Kate, 28, UK)

“I’m actually about to have my second child, can I tell you, I still worry about my post-baby body. I’m naturally quite thin, workout several times a week and maintain a sensible diet, but after my first child, my physique totally change. I noticed more fat migrating to my tummy and thighs. Now I have a little pouch that I just can’t get rid of. No matter how much I exercise or how healthy I eat.” (Julia, 27, U.S.)

Would You Have Cosmetic Surgery? 

In a recent poll, young mothers were asked if they would ever undergo any kind of cosmetic surgery (invasive or non-invasive) to help get back to their pre-baby bodies. 46% agree that they would be open to some minimally invasive or non invasive cosmetic surgery if it meant improving their self confidence and increasing their overall happiness. 12% admit that they’ve already had some work done, or are interested in a more invasive procedure.

When we asked our mommy-to-be’s, they had the following to say:

Michelle, UK

Michelle, 26, UK, opens up about her post-baby body fears.

“Sure, why not? I am proud of my body. Giving birth is beautiful. But I want to feel sexy too! I am young and I don’t want to spend the next 50+ years hiding my tummy.” – Julia

“I’ve thought about it, but I’m not sure. I think if it was something minimally invasive or noninvasive, I’d totally be open to it. Maybe a laser treatment for my stretch mark. I wish we didn’t have to have this discussion, but it’s a real fear for many young mothers. We should support one another and do what’s best for us and our bodies.” -Michelle

Read More: 6 Brave Women Share What Pregnancy Did To Their Bodies